Category Archives: Media analytics

How is multivariate data analysis used in marketing?

Published / by Simon Foster

‘Multivariate’ means ‘many variables’ and in the context of marketing it usually means analysing multiple variables from customer records to get a deeper understanding of the customer base. This increased understanding of customer behaviour permits the development of customised offers, relevant creative messaging and more accurate media targeting – particularly with techniques like email and behavioural targeting. Very strong offer targeting will significantly increase your response and sales conversion rates.  Any company that has a database of more than around 5,000 records should be using multivariate data analysis to analyse customer data and improve marketing performance.

The most common forms of multivariate analysis in marketing are cluster analysis and hierarchical analysis. Cluster analysis uses statistical techniques to allocate customers into segments based on how similar, or dissimilar, they are to each other. So for example, if you had 10,000 customers and you were clustering by income and home ownership, you would be able to define groups of customers with similar levels of income and home ownership status, or those with high income and low home ownership status, or those with low income and high home ownership status. The number of clusters generated depends on how you set up your cluster analysis and of course, what patterns actually lie within your data. You can set up your analysis to produce either a large or small number of clusters, but most marketers can’t practically service more than about fifteen clusters.

Hierarchical analysis breaks customers down into sub-sets of the whole customer base. Results of hierarchical analysis are often shown as dendograms or tree diagrams. In a tree diagram, all customers belong to the ‘root’ and segments of the customer base are called ‘nodes’, nodes are connnected to the tree by ‘branches’.  So for example, all customers can be divided into males and females. Then the males and the females can be divided by age, and then by income and then by spend. You are then able to see what proportion of the whole base is composed of customers with certain characteristics.  Here are some examples of customer segments defined using hierarchical analysis:

  1. Spend more than £250 per year and are aged 18-34 and female and do not have children
  2. Spend more than £500 per year and are aged 25-44 and male and do not have children and earn between £20,000 and £30,000 and have a mortgage
  3. Spend more than £1000 per year and are aged 35-54 and have children and have a mortgage and live in the South East

Whichever technique you use, it is likely that you will see a small number of segments account for disproportionally large amounts of sales revenue or sales potential. When you have identified these segments you can leverage what you know to develop tailored offers, messages and targeting. Over and above this you can identify customers who have the characteristics of high performance segment membership, but are not spending at the rate they could be. You can use this information to target your marketing messages to the sales prospects with the highest untapped potential.

What is predictive modelling in marketing?

Published / by Simon Foster

Predictive modelling is a term with many applications in statistics but in database marketing it is a technique used to identify customers or prospects who, given their demographic characteristics or past purchase behaviour, are highly likely to purchase a given product. In this context, ‘predictive’ does not simply mean predicting the future; it means identifying the quantitative factors that can be used to predict buyer behaviour. Predictive modelling is a powerful data analysis technique that can be used to target email and direct mail activity, and to some degree behavioural targeting in online media.

Here’s an example: Let say you sell 10 products. It may be the case that all purchasers of product 8 are: 1) in a certain geodemographic group, 2) married with more than one child and 3) own more than one car. All these factors can be analysed and combined to predict the likelihood of any consumer in your database buying product 8. Usually this combined measure is referred to as a ’score’ i.e. a figure which represents the presence or combination of certain variables in the consumer record. Once you have developed your scoring model you can rank all customers by their score. When you’ve stripped out those who have already bought product 8, you are left with a set of high potential prospects.

Predictive modelling can also be undertaken based on transactional information about past purchases. Going back to the 10 products, it may be the case that 80% of people who buy product 7 have previously bought products 2, 5 and 6 and in that order. So we can say that people who have bought products 2, 5 and 6 (in that order) but who have not yet purchased product 7, are much more likely to buy product 7 than everyone in your database. Again a score is attached to these behaviours and that score can be used to rank your prospects in terms of untapped sales potential.

Of course as well as predicting purchase behaviour, these techniques can be used to predict risk. In credit assessment for example, it may be the case that those customers who have certain demographic characteristics combined with a certain type of past purchase behaviour are highly likely to default on a credit agreement. This is sometimes referred to as credit scoring. If you are rejected for credit at a bank or in a shop it will be because your data has been analysed and your credit risk score is deemed too high or low to meet the criteria of the lender.

These predictions can help you target your communications very efficiently and also help you control commercial risk in customer behaviour. What’s interesting about these techniques is that they help both the marketing department and the finance department. Marketing delivers customers who are both highly likely to convert to sales or high lifetime value whilst at the same time, producing customers who are less likely to cause problems for the finance department. Overall, this means that the resources of the business are being better utilised.

Advertising Frequency and Diminishing Marginal Utility

Published / by Simon Foster

diminishing-marginal-utility

Economists have a concept called Diminishing Marginal Utility. This means that each additional time a consumer consumes something they get less satisfaction from consuming it. So, if I have one coffee, I find it very satisfying, two could be OK, but by the time I get to three I’m not getting much additional satisfaction, infact, I’m going off coffee pretty fast. And if I were to drink ten coffees I’d feel like I was being tortured.

Now let me apply this thinking to the world of TV advertising and in particular, sponsorship. In the UK, quality drama is a favourite for sponsorship. One of the reasons for this is that these programmes attract a high quality loyal audience who make an appointment to view. Certain drama strands can be sponsored heavily in a cross-programme deal covering different programmes in the same genre. Whilst this may appear to present great media value it can mean over-exposure for both brands and consumers. Seeing a break bumper a couple of times is fine, but seeing the same branded break bumper ten times in the same evening can seem like drinking that tenth cup of coffee.